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Goal Achieving results in upcoming competitions and studying accordingly

Discussion in 'Misc' started by Kostadin, Dec 21, 2017.

Goal: Studying hard to qualify for next stages of competitions by February 14, 2018 (finished)

100%

Completed

Member Kostadin commits to the following actions to achieve this goal

54 study time during the holidays
studying for 4 hours a day outside of school after holidays

  1. Kostadin

    Kostadin Active Member

    Rating points:
    159
    Action points:
    337
    Result points:
    270
  2. Tom

    Tom Active Member

    Rating points:
    108
    Action points:
    261
    Result points:
    221
    Good luck with stuff man!
     
  3. James

    James Host

    OK! I'll work out how to reopen this, then let you know
     
  4. James

    James Host

    @Kostadin OK we'll do it like this: post your result as a normal post, and then I'll manually change it to a Result post.
     
  5. Kostadin

    Kostadin Active Member

    Rating points:
    159
    Action points:
    337
    Result points:
    270

    Result

    The actual results:
    English: 74.5/100 (90 points needed to pass to round 3)
    Philosophy: 62.5/100 (75 points needed to pass to round 3)
    Chemistry:12/100 (doesn't really matter in this case)

    What went wrong:
    1) Everybody said that the papers for the English competition were exceptionally hard this year, and the total results confirm this. However, my goal was to go to round 3, and I did not.
    2) Marks on a subjective fields of study are... well subjective. I will be given back my essay with recension in the future, hopefully. And no matter the excuses, I still didn't achieve what I wanted.
    3) Well I basically had decided that I only had time to prepare for the other two. While achieving any points on the second round of this competition for somebody who started studying the subject in depth just 4 months ago is an achievement, because the tasks have almost nothing to do with what we study, my result is still not exactly something to be proud of.

    For next year, I will probably prepare for only two of those. (and the excluded subject is probably going to be Chemistry)
     
    Voting on this result has closed.
  6. James

    James Host

    @Kostadin OK I've changed it to a result.

    As for the result, well you tried decently hard, so use these scores as feedback. A 12/100 score indicates "no aptitude or interest". So you're right to exclude chemistry for next year. There's no point investing effort in something you're not designed for, because you'll get better returns elsewhere.

    Then beyond that, you should start thinking about what you're seeking to achieve, going forward in your life. Understand that parents & teachers have declared test scores an important thing, but in the real world they have little importance, beyond getting into a university course you want (if you want), or practicing competition (like in these round-based tests).

    So for the English test, yes, it's valuable, because English is used as an international language. But for the philosophy test, what is its practical application? How will knowing philosophy pay off in the future? There are very few professions that it is used in. So even if you do score well on a philosophy test, the world looks at it and says "so what?".

    Also note that as you said, the marks on those subjects are subjective. That's true. But the real world has objective marks. You won't be judged by the arbitrary tastes of a teacher/examiner, but with "yes I'll buy / no I won't" of real people.

    So question: have you had any ideas on what kind of profession you might want to pursue? Or are there specific topics that interest you?

    At your age, working out what you should do is the most important work. It's an exploration process. What do I enjoy, what am I interested in, what am I good at, etc -- i.e. "what is me?". The next step is working out "what is in market demand?", i.e. "what is the market?" (or more generally "what does society want and need?"). The last step is connecting "me and market" in the best possible way. That is the path to winning.
     
  7. Tom

    Tom Active Member

    Rating points:
    108
    Action points:
    261
    Result points:
    221
    Close man! You tried very hard, props for that.

    I echo what @James said. Time to have a good sit down about what you enjoy, what you're good at and what you can do with it.
     
  8. Gort

    Gort Robot

    Notification: The result has been rated.

    Congratulations on following this goal to the end!

    The average goal result rating was: 3.00 (Grade: C- — Marginal fail).

    Updates Report
    Total updates submitted: 6 of 6
    Average update rating: 3.00 (Medium action towards goal)


    Next Steps
    You were close to achieving this goal, and you took medium action. For the next goal, commit to going all out.
     
  9. Kostadin

    Kostadin Active Member

    Rating points:
    159
    Action points:
    337
    Result points:
    270
    While I understand the pragmatic ideas, and I am a practical person myself (or at least I think that's the case) there are some things that have happened in my life that have shown me that doing stuff only if it is going to be beneficial for you doesn't really do it. Let me explain.

    My grandfather (my father's) is an ex-captain of a ship, specialized in long overseas travel. Getting to this high of a rank during the socialist regime is no joke, especially if you come from a family in a small village. I can keep writing, but what's important is that my granddad never had it easy. This made his personality quite rough, now add to this at least 25 years of traveling, sometimes for more than 9 months. You know what this leads to: my father (and his brother as well) were brought up by a single mother. Things here in Eastern Europe are quite different, some women (especially those of the older generations) were the definition of the "independent woman" that the "feminists" claim they want to be. Believe me, those same women wish they didn't have to deal with this themselves. I got a bit carried away though.
    My father's upbringing wasn't nice. He's always been very bright, but due to his bad choices in life he eventually gave up. Not one particular thing, I mean everything. I don't even know how he is going to deal with both my half-brother and half-sister. I also have another half-brother that I've never met. He should be around 5th grade by now, I think. My "male role model" is practically non-existent. Or not? One could say family's story shows pretty much every possible mistake that can be made in such relationship, and that I should just do the exact opposite.
    My grandfather has always been a pragmatic. So what? I've never seen a man more dissatisfied. He forgot to call me for my birthday, but when he overheard from a conversation I was having with my grandmother about another event on the topic of philosophy that I attended a week ago, he phoned to tell me that I'm "getting sidetracked". I would much rather be sidetracked by stuff that I enjoy instead of doing his mistakes. My grandparents had so much money during the socialism they couldn't spend it.
    My father had decided that he was not going to repeat his father's mistakes. And he tried, but lost faith at some point and started doing a lot of dumb stuff that made his (and mine) life look like those exaggerated Indian TV series. But he never really worked towards what he really wanted when he was young - being a programmer instead of an accountant. And he really regrets it deep down, I can see it in his eyes.
    If I am to do a mistake, I want it to be a different one. This of course does not mean that I'll be studying Philosophy in university. However, this is what I want to be doing currently, and as long as it does not drag me down, I will be doing it until I want to stop. And, it feels great using my brain's potential into trying to understand what some borderline crazy guy was thinking about hundreds of years ago, no matter how weird it sounds. I also met a lot of like-minded people (which I have been struggling to do for years) thanks to my "sidetracking". It's not that big of a waste of time at the end, I guess?


    What is my vision of the way I'm going to be buying my bread?
    A job that requires active thinking, that is not entirely about communication between me and a machine (no programming), and is not about memorizing a lot of stuff, which I'm not exactly good at. (so no law or a medical profession) Definitely not accounting, since that's what both my parents do and I can just see that it is not for me. I've been thinking about journalism. Maybe even business sciences (that have nothing to do with accounting, maybe management, or something else?). I also love writing, and my works (not necessarily on the topic of philosophy, literature as well) are quite good, and that's something that I could be doing on the side. I would love to do acting, although it is the kind of a job that sunks in your life, which I'm trying to avoid. Psychology is another field that is interesting to me. The thing is, I'm don't have sufficient knowledge about all kinds of jobs and that's something I need to find time to familiarize myself with the matter.
     
  10. James

    James Host

    Makes sense.

    Your ability to memorize things is connected to their importance. I know guys who can tell me the size, shape, brand, design, model number of every component in any model of car -- because they're interested in that. But they'll never remember who the Kings of England were even if you told them 100 times.

    So don't write off law just yet. Some people find law interesting. I've also met guys in international law -- which necessitates bilingual (or a bilingual business partner) + knowing two bodies of law, who make very good money.

    For these, it's very important to check market demand. The simplest way is to get in contact with some guys who graduated in these, and ask them about it. These two are very high up on the list of "I'll do this in university because it sounds interesting -> Oh dear I can't get a job / I don't want to do this anymore".

    Also there's nothing stopping you from going to industrial fairs at 17. You can check out a bunch of different things, to start getting a picture of what's hot. Remember that Steve Jobs was a hippie. It was only when he saw his first opportunity to make money that he was ignited into a successful businessman.

    Also, as for the stuff about your grandfather, my recommendation would be biographies. Get a set of biographies of great men, who lived successful, happy lives, and read them all. If you don't have a model of a winner in your life, acquire substitutes (biographies, or more powerfully, mentors).
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2018

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